Legal aspects Before Burial or Cremation

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6 Responses

  1. Carol Kirk
    |

    This is so interesting. I understand there is a law but what about the whanau of the deceased. Can there be a middle ground a solution the suits all?

  2. emmahinton
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    Hi, I’ve gone off Facebook. Is there another link to the video, please.

    • Kerry-Ann
      |

      HI Emma
      Not that I can find. However, there are a small number of related Te Karere pieces on YouTube
      regards
      Kerry-Ann

      • Hayley Atkins
        |

        Hi Kerry and Emma,

        I have managed to extract the video from Facebook and upload it to WeTransfer – you can download it from the following link:
        https://we.tl/t-NwVCsihgHE

        Hope thats helpful if not now, then for future students 🙂

        • Kerry-Ann
          |

          Thank you!

  3. suzannepanter
    |

    This particular issue is not unique to the Maori culture but effects a lot of cultures for whom it is important to be able to care for their family member immediately following their death. I have personal experience of this and believe that whilst I completely understand in the event of a sudden/unexplained death, the reason for this has to be established, there could surely be some middle ground reached ? I also believe that how this issue is approached and dealt with is vital as this is a highly emotional and sensitive time for all concerned. Cultural awareness and understanding and how the process is explained to the family if done in the correct way can allay some of the anguish. This can be put into place by providing appropriate training for those working within the field particularly in the coroners office/hospital staff and officials.